Bowel cancer rates rising 'among young adults'

More young people under 50 are being diagnosed with bowel cancer, the studies of the disease in European and high-income countries have found.

Although total numbers of cases in young people remain low, the studies highlighted a sharp rise in rates in 20 to 29-year-olds.

Researchers are not clear why this is happening, but say obesity and poor diet could be factors, according to BBC.

Experts urged doctors not to ignore symptoms in young people.

What You Need to Know About Candida Auris

A mysterious and dangerous fungal infection called Candida auris has emerged around the world. It is resistant to many antifungal medications, placing it among a growing number of germs that have evolved defenses against common medicines. Here are some basic facts about it.

What is Candida auris?

Candida auris is a fungus that, when it gets into the bloodstream, can cause dangerous infections that can be life-threatening. In recent years, it has emerged around the world, largely in hospitals and nursing homes.

C. auris is often resistant to major antifungal drugs that are typically used to treat such infections. The C.D.C. says that more than 90 percent of C. auris infections are resistant to at least one such drug, while 30 percent are resistant to two or more major drugs. Once the germ is present, it is hard to eradicate from a facility. Some hospitals have had to bring in special cleaning equipment and even rip out floor and ceiling tiles to get rid of it.

Prior eating disorders linked to long-term depression risk for mothers

A history of eating disorders and body image concerns before or during pregnancy are associated with future depressive symptoms among mothers, according to Science Daily.

"We found that women who have had an eating disorder at any point before childbirth, even if it was years earlier in adolescence, were more likely to experience depressive symptoms during pregnancy and up to 18 years after the birth of their child," said the study's lead author Dr Francesca Solmi (UCL Psychiatry).

Charcoal toothpastes 'don't whiten teeth'

Charcoal-based toothpastes, which claim to whiten teeth, are a "marketing gimmick" which could increase the risk of tooth decay and staining, says a review in the British Dental Journal.

The charcoal products, which are increasingly popular, often contain no fluoride to help protect the teeth, according to BBC.

And there is no scientific evidence to back up the claims they make, the authors say.

Coffee is NOT bad for your heart (if you drink fewer than 6 a day)

To anyone that can stomach six cups of coffee a day, new research suggests that's not a good idea.

A study by the University of South Australia found drinking more than six cups a day increased the risk of heart disease by 22 percent.

The findings, likely, won't have much of an impact on most of us , according to Daily Mail.

But the research digs into a debate about the threshold before caffeine becomes dangerous, after a spate of deaths linked to extremely high caffeine intake, and research that suggested six cups could be protective for your heart.