Emotional robot lets you feel how it's 'feeling'

Cornell University researchers have developed a prototype of a robot that can express "emotions" through changes in its outer surface. The robot's skin covers a grid of texture units whose shapes change based on the robot's feelings.

Assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering Guy Hoffman, who has given a TEDx talk on "Robots with 'soul'" said the inspiration for designing a robot that gives off nonverbal cues through its outer skin comes from the animal world, based on the idea that robots shouldn't be thought of in human terms, according to Science Daily.

Rich people are less likely than the poor to share their wealth with others: scientists

The most generous people are those who have the least, according to scientists.

Based on a psychological experiment, those deemed to be of 'higher status' were found to be more selfish than those of 'lower status', according to Daily Mail.

Scientists at Queen Mary University also discovered that how a person amassed their fortune matters when it comes to determining how willing they are to share.

How do horses read human emotional cues?

Scientists demonstrated for the first time that horses integrate human facial expressions and voice tones to perceive human emotion, regardless of whether the person is familiar or not, according to Science Daily.

Recent studies showed the herd-forming animal possesses high communication capabilities, and can read the emotions of their peers through facial expressions and contact calls, or whinnies. Horses have long been used as a working animal and also as a companion animal in sports and leisure, establishing close relationships with humans just like dogs do with people.

Sorry ladies! Men really ARE better at navigating: Their superior sense of direction allows them to be more efficient and make better use of shortcuts, claim scientists

It has been the subject of countless arguments between couples, but scientists have finally proven that men are 'significantly' more efficient at navigating than women.

According to new research, men are more likely to reach their destination faster than their female counterparts, according to Daily Mail.

This is typically because men are more likely to use a shortcut to get to their destination, while women prefer to stick with a tried-and-tested route

Researchers conducted a series of experiments to try to determine the difference in how the sexes navigate.

Genome structure of dinosaurs discovered by bird-turtle comparisons

A discovery by scientists has provided significant insight into the overall genome structure of dinosaurs, according to Science Daily.

By comparing the genomes of different species, chiefly birds and turtles, the team were able to determine how the overall genome structure (i.e. the chromosomes) of many people's favourite dinosaur species -- like Velociraptor or Tyrannosaurus -- might have looked through a microscope.

The research was carried out in the laboratory of Professor Darren Griffin.