We may have less control over our thoughts than previously assumed

Think you're totally in control of your thoughts? Maybe not as much as you think, according to a new San Francisco State University study that examines how thoughts that lead to actions enter our consciousness.

While we can "decide" to think about certain things, other information -- including activities we have learned like counting -- can enter our subconscious and cause us to think about something else, whether we want to or not. Psychologists call these dispositions "sets," explains Professor of Psychology Ezequiel Morsella, one of four authors on a new study that examines how sets influence what we end up thinking about, according to Science Daily.

Newborn planet pictured for first time

Astronomers have captured this image of a planet that's still forming in the disk of gas and dust around its star.

Researchers have long been on the hunt for a baby planet, and this is the first confirmed discovery of its kind, according to BBC.

Young dwarf star PDS 70 is less than 10 million years old, and its planetary companion is thought to be between five and six million years old.

Why scientists are counting seal pups in the Thames Estuary

Sixty years ago the Thames Estuary was regarded as "biologically dead" and largely devoid of wildlife.

But, in recent years seals have returned to the Thames as well as to the coastal and low-lying lands bordering the estuary, according to BBC.

Last year, scientists recorded more than 3,500 harbour and grey seals.

Now, they are starting the first count of seal pups to see how important the area is a breeding ground.

Pulse wave analysis provides reliable information on heart health in young people

Arterial stiffness is one of the early signs of cardiovascular disease, and arterial stiffening has been observed in children. A recent study suggests that an easy-to-use, non-invasive method can produce reproducible estimates of arterial stiffness in adolescents aged 16-19 years, according to Science Daily.

The study investigated the short-term reproducibility of aortic pulse wave velocity as a measure of arterial stiffness and of augmentation index as a measure of peripheral arterial tone among 55 adolescents aged 16-19. The study also investigated the effects of cardiorespiratory fitness and body fat percentage on the reproducibility. Arterial stiffness and peripheral arterial tone were measured with a non-invasive, oscillometric pulse wave analyzer, cardiorespiratory fitness using a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test on a cycle ergometer, and body fat percentage through bioelectrical impedance analysis.

`Oumuamua gets a boost

Oumuamua -- the first interstellar object discovered within our Solar System -- has been the subject of intense scrutiny since its discovery in October 2017 [1]. Now, by combining data from the ESO's Very Large Telescope and other observatories, an international team of astronomers has found that the object is moving faster than predicted. The measured gain in speed is tiny and `Oumuamua is still slowing down because of the pull of the Sun -- just not as fast as predicted by celestial mechanics, according to Science Daily.

The team, led by Marco Micheli (European Space Agency) explored several scenarios to explain the faster-than-predicted speed of this peculiar interstellar visitor. The most likely explanation is that `Oumuamua is venting material from its surface due to solar heating -- a behaviour known as outgassing [2]. The thrust from this ejected material is thought to provide the small but steady push that is sending `Oumuamua hurtling out of the Solar System faster than expected -- as of 1 June 2018 it is traveling at roughly 114,000 kilometres per hour.

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